Ex holiday cottage as new family home.

How will oil depletion affect the way we live? What will the economic impact be? How will agriculture change? Will we thrive or merely survive?

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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

Heating and hot water installation now planned, and work has started.

Chimney swept and examined and pronounced fit for use, stove delivered and pipework started.
The only setback has been doubts about the strength of the upstairs floor to support the very large hot water cylinder. Supports to be built in room below.
This sounds complex but the builder says it is easy.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
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emordnilap
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Post by emordnilap »

adam2 wrote:Water from the cistern has now been analysed with following results.

Total dissolved solids---------high
Agrochemicals----------------very low
Petrochemicals----------------very low
Lead----------------------------low
Other heavy metals-----------low
Bacteriological count----------medium
PH------------------------------alkaline

Summary, fit for general domestic use but not recommended for drinking.
Going on that, I'd just fit a stainless steel filter (for the muck) and drink it. It's about what ours was when we tested it after drinking it for 10 years...

A body's immune system benefits from being challenged. Your body wants to stay healthy but won't if you try to shield it from the natural world.
I experience pleasure and pains, and pursue goals in service of them, so I cannot reasonably deny the right of other sentient agents to do the same - Steven Pinker
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Post by kenneal - lagger »

adam2 wrote:...The only setback has been doubts about the strength of the upstairs floor to support the very large hot water cylinder. Supports to be built in room below.
This sounds complex but the builder says it is easy.
Just a few bits of braced studwork would do it.
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

IIRC, the strengthening works will consist of two walls of brickwork, protruding into the downstairs room by about 1M.
Tied into the existing masonry at the rear, and the two new walls tied to each other by concrete lintels at about one third and two thirds up.

The concrete lintels will support shelves in addition to stabilising the structure.
Atop the two new walls will be a couple more lintels that will support the existing floor joists. The joists will therefore be supported at each end as originally, and also in the middle.
The new very large hot water tank will be directly over the extra supports.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
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BritDownUnder
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Post by BritDownUnder »

I am interested to know how big is the hot water tank? Will it be used as energy storage or a 'dump' for excess solar power or a thermal mass perhaps?
Please elaborate as this is something I have been considering also.
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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

I don't recall the exact size of the hot water tank, but it is very much larger than would be used in most homes.
It is simply for domestic hot water, not for space heating.

It is equipped with 2 coils, top and bottom, and also with provision for 2 electric immersion heaters, also top and bottom.
To be heated via the stove in winter, and from surplus PV in summer.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
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BritDownUnder
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Post by BritDownUnder »

There is supposedly a house in Brisbane where the builders put in a 19000 litre hot water tank in the basement. I believe it was just solar heated and the tank was plastic not copper and had no heating elements. It was in the basement and supposedly kept the occupants warm in Brisbane when the temperature went below 20C in the winter.

It would make sense to 'spill the excess PV electricity into the tank rather than the grid in the first instance.
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Mark
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Post by Mark »

emordnilap wrote:
adam2 wrote:Water from the cistern has now been analysed with following results.

Total dissolved solids---------high
Agrochemicals----------------very low
Petrochemicals----------------very low
Lead----------------------------low
Other heavy metals-----------low
Bacteriological count----------medium
PH------------------------------alkaline

Summary, fit for general domestic use but not recommended for drinking.
Going on that, I'd just fit a stainless steel filter (for the muck) and drink it. It's about what ours was when we tested it after drinking it for 10 years...

A body's immune system benefits from being challenged. Your body wants to stay healthy but won't if you try to shield it from the natural world.
The clue is the word 'dissolved'... Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) is any compounds left in the water after normal treatment and filtration.
A fine filter will only remove suspended solids - what remains in the water after filtration are typically calcium, sodium, potassium and magnesium ions, although some organic salts may also be present. Water softeners are a common way to remove TDS, although reverse osmosis can also be used.

Also, the sample has a 'medium' bacteriological count. Granted, there are some benefits in building up immunity, but it depends on what has been found.....?? Can also be removed, but at a cost....
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emordnilap
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Post by emordnilap »

Mark wrote:
emordnilap wrote:
adam2 wrote:Water from the cistern has now been analysed with following results.

Total dissolved solids---------high
Agrochemicals----------------very low
Petrochemicals----------------very low
Lead----------------------------low
Other heavy metals-----------low
Bacteriological count----------medium
PH------------------------------alkaline

Summary, fit for general domestic use but not recommended for drinking.
Going on that, I'd just fit a stainless steel filter (for the muck) and drink it. It's about what ours was when we tested it after drinking it for 10 years...

A body's immune system benefits from being challenged. Your body wants to stay healthy but won't if you try to shield it from the natural world.
The clue is the word 'dissolved'... Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) is any compounds left in the water after normal treatment and filtration.
A fine filter will only remove suspended solids - what remains in the water after filtration are typically calcium, sodium, potassium and magnesium ions, although some organic salts may also be present.
You're right. We filter out sand from our water using a stainless mesh filter, mainly for the washing machine rather than our benefit! It's very fussy.

The rest of the stuff gives the water character... :lol: And coffee (ground, cafetière) tastes wonderful, visitors comment on how good it is. The same coffee and method using water in a holiday home was undrinkable.
I experience pleasure and pains, and pursue goals in service of them, so I cannot reasonably deny the right of other sentient agents to do the same - Steven Pinker
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Post by kenneal - lagger »

Bacteria can be killed using a UV light source. There are numerous propriety units to do this.
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

Work continues.
Support for new very large hot water tank completed, tank connected.
Central heating done. This consists of a single loop of large bore copper pipe round the entire upstairs perimeter, gravity circulation.
No radiators, the large bore pipe IS the radiating surface.

Pv working fine, nearly 200 amps measured into the battery bank.

A gravity ceramic water filter has been purchased for drinking water.

The previously unknown sewage disposal arrangements have been traced, it flows by gravity to a private treatment works from whence the treated effluent is discharged to a stream.

The whole family expect to move into the property within a month.
This will be a considerable improvement over the present socially rented home.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
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Post by kenneal - lagger »

Have they got a read bed final treatment before the sewage discharge goes into the stream?
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

The sewage works is run by a farm, not by the owners of the ex holiday home.
The waste passes through a coarse strainer, then to a settling lagoon, and then trickles over coke beds to expose to the air and oxidise organic matter.
Finally into a shallow pond containing vegetation, though this does not look like reeds.
A weir overflows into the stream.

I only got a quick look though.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

All major work is now complete and the whole family have moved in.

Much painting and decorating remains to be done and some building of fixed furniture, but that can be done as time and money permits.

Heating works fine, whether by luck or design I know not ! With a modest fire in the stove, the main living area reaches an average of 22 degrees and the upstairs about 20 degrees.
Domestic hot water works OK.
PV and battery system working fine, a wind turbine has now been added as was purchased cheaply.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
kenneal - lagger
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Post by kenneal - lagger »

adam2 wrote:...Heating works fine, whether by luck or design I know not ! With a modest fire in the stove, the main living area reaches an average of 22 degrees and the upstairs about 20 degrees.
....
Heating? Already?
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
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