Timetable set to phase out high-energy light bulbs

For technical discussions about electricity, electrical equipment with particular emphasis on safe and compliant installations.
Off topic remarks are liable to be moved elsewhere, or in extreme cases to be deleted.
vtsnowedin
Posts: 6596
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 10:14 pm
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

Post by vtsnowedin »

adam2 wrote:Meanwhile in America, the government reveres earlier plans to increase the efficiency of lighting.
https://www.npr.org/2019/09/04/75762382 ... ight-bulbs

A splendid victory for energy waste, and sod the environment.

And whilst the lower mains voltage in the USA SLIGHTLY reduces the savings from use of low energy lamps, the difference is very minor.
Not to worry. If LEDs are indeed cheaper in the long run considering all costs (initial cost, life expectancy, and KWHs used) the public will move to them without a government mandate.
User avatar
adam2
Site Admin
Posts: 8486
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:49 pm
Location: North Somerset

Post by adam2 »

I disagree. Most consumers in the UK are quite unable to grasp the long term consequences of small hourly costs.
The saving of a penny an hour is regarded as utterly insignificant if indeed it is considered at all.

The average consumer hates buying light bulbs and tends to choose the cheapest available without any consideration of the running costs.

I presume that circumstances are similar in the USA.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
vtsnowedin
Posts: 6596
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 10:14 pm
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

Post by vtsnowedin »

adam2 wrote:I disagree. Most consumers in the UK are quite unable to grasp the long term consequences of small hourly costs.
The saving of a penny an hour is regarded as utterly insignificant if indeed it is considered at all.

The average consumer hates buying light bulbs and tends to choose the cheapest available without any consideration of the running costs.

I presume that circumstances are similar in the USA.
While electric bills are a small part of a US family budget (My last months bill was $77.22) heads of household do look for savings when selecting appliances and bulbs. Store displays are pushing LED bulbs and indeed you have to actively shop for an old style wasteful bulb.
As an aside I just ordered three 12 volt 7 watt LED bulbs for use in my off grid "high hide" deer stand. They presently will be fed off a deep cycle marine lead acid battery having 650 cold cranking amps storage.Final plan is to roof mount a solar panel of 100 watts or larger to run both the lights and electric exclusion fences around food plots surrounding the high hide.
User avatar
adam2
Site Admin
Posts: 8486
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:49 pm
Location: North Somerset

Post by adam2 »

"cold cranking amps" is not a measure of energy storage.
It is an indication of how many amps the battery can supply for a very short and specified time, at a low and specified temperature, and without the voltage dropping too low.
It is a useful guide as to the engine starting capabilities of a battery, esp. in low temperatures when starting is problematic.

To determine the energy storage capacity of a battery, you need to know the capacity in AH or ampere hours.
A small and lightweight 12 volt car battery will have a capacity as low as 30 AH, a larger and heavy duty car battery up to about 45 H.
Deep cycle batteries range from about 60 AH up to about 200 AH in 12 volt batteries.
60 AH is somewhat portable. 200AH is about the sensible limit for manual handling.

A 60 AH battery will supply 3 amps for 20 hours if fully discharged. Except in an emergency, full discharge should be avoided as it drastically reduces battery life.
A car battery should withstand up to a dozen full discharges.
A deep cycle leisure battery should withstand 100 deep discharges, or many hundreds of 50% discharges.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
User avatar
adam2
Site Admin
Posts: 8486
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:49 pm
Location: North Somerset

Post by adam2 »

Coloured incandescent lamps are hugely wasteful of energy, much worse than white incandescent lamps, because most of the light is wasted in the colour filter.

Several suppliers now offer coloured LED filament lamps, these are highly efficient because the LEDs are selected to emit light of the desired colour, with no loss in a filter.

Red, blue, green and yellow lamps are readily available, whilst pink, magenta, and violet can be found.

With the festive season approaching these lamps are well worth considering for decorative uses.

https://www.lightbulbworld.co.uk/bell-b ... 3564-p.asp

This is a very rare case of a supplier actually UNDERSTATING the performance of a product. The light output of a 4 watt lamp is stated to be equivalent to a 40 watt incandescent.
This might be true of white lamps, but for a 4 watt blue LED lamp as is illustrated, the light is much brighter than a 100 watt blue incandescent.
And probably brighter than 400 watts of blue incandescent.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
User avatar
adam2
Site Admin
Posts: 8486
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:49 pm
Location: North Somerset

Re: Timetable set to phase out high-energy light bulbs

Post by adam2 »

The ban is to be extended to many types of halogen lamp.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-57407233

As with previous bans, it is manufacture or import that is to be prohibited, existing stocks may be used without concerns.

I expect that there will be a number of exemptions and loopholes and that sales will continue for some time.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
User avatar
adam2
Site Admin
Posts: 8486
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:49 pm
Location: North Somerset

Re: Timetable set to phase out high-energy light bulbs

Post by adam2 »

Reading the actual government press release.https://www.gov.uk/government/news/end- ... ner-future

Adds little hard information. It does however say that SALES of halogen lamps are to be banned from September this year. I wonder if they mean it ? Previous bans have only related to manufacture or import, with existing stocks being sold lawfully.
Politicians might not know the difference between the two options of banning sales, or of banning manufacture and imports.

Also the government press release contains no detail as to which halogen lamps are to be banned. An exemption for stage, filming, or TV production is noted, but which types ?
What about vehicle headlight lamps ?

Or perhaps most types will still be allowed if marked as being "only for theatre or motor vehicle use"
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
User avatar
adam2
Site Admin
Posts: 8486
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:49 pm
Location: North Somerset

Re: Timetable set to phase out high-energy light bulbs

Post by adam2 »

It would appear that the government press release contained a number of factual errors.

The lighting industry have now published a correction and clarification which makes the position clearer.
Sales of existing stocks is permitted, as I suspected, based on earlier bans.
Self ballasted compact fluorescents are banned. As are the lower quality LEDs.

https://www.thelia.org.uk/news/569044/L ... tions.htm#

I appreciate that this is a trade organisation, but they have a good reputation and would not, I hope, publish factually incorrect information
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
Post Reply