Fire watch

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kenneal - lagger
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Re: Fire watch

Post by kenneal - lagger »

That sort of fire spread shouldn't be a problem in the UK as the building regs prohibit that sort of construction within a unsafe distance of another property. Like wise in semi detached and terraced properties there should be fire breaks between the properties to prevent a fire in one spreading to the other. While not entirely effective, there have been a few fires recently where the fire has spread, it has allowed the fire brigade time to get to the properties and stop a large scale spread of the fire. The roof seems to have been the weak point where the spread has occurred which is logical really as heat rises into the roof and felt and battens are continuous across the roofs of all the dwellings in the row.

This propagation could be stopped by the insistence on the wall between the properties extending through the roof which you used to see on Victorian properties and some more recent ones built in the Victorian style, but this has problems of its own regarding weather proofing and additional cost. The extra weather proofing is necessary for the more constant problem of rain in this country so to insist on a fire prevention measure against a problem which rarely occurs, and is not usually fatal when it does occur, seems more than a bit over the top.
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BritDownUnder
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Re: Fire watch

Post by BritDownUnder »

Some house owners in Australia have fitted sprinkler systems for their houses to continually douse down the exterior of the house as a means of protecting houses. How they are constructed and what effect they have I don't know.

On some of the new footage uploaded to YouTube quite a lot of fences were also alight.

I will have to look at some drone footage of recent Australian fires to see what happens here. I could not imagine large scale destruction of UK housing by 'wildfires' even under the most extreme future warming scenarios.
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kenneal - lagger
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Re: Fire watch

Post by kenneal - lagger »

Part of the problem with many wildfires we have seen is the resinous nature of the trees which makes them more flammable. We have a few areas where houses have been built within areas of pine forest, mainly around heathland areas, where this could be a problem. The Dorset Heaths around Bournemouth for instance and the heathland to the west of Wokingham and south of Reading are two areas that I know of which would be vulnerable to such fires after a drought. Most of our deciduous woodland, while it would burn if it became dry enough, is not quite as flammable as evergreen woodland and doesn't build up quite as much flammable litter. Many of the wildfires that we see in the UK are heathland fires where highly flammable gorse and also heather are the problem.

Having put that in writing we can now expect the mother of all droughts and extensive wildfires in the UK.
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kenneal - lagger
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Re: Fire watch

Post by kenneal - lagger »

According to this American, rather long, article the cause of the spread of fire around boulder in the US was the 80+ mph wind which caused an ember storm which found its way into buildings through air vents and any nook or cranny combined with a very wet spring leading to excess grass growth and then a very hot and dry summer and autumn which left a large amount of dry grass ready to burn.

The radiation which I spoke of in an earlier post wouldn't have been such a problem with 80+ mph winds blowing flames and embers between houses although it would have helped.

It shows the importance of establishing an airtight barrier around the outside perimeter of the house which is an importance part of Passivhaus design.
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
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