Seriously considering relocating to the Highlands

What changes can we make to our lives to deal with the economic and energy crises ahead? Have you already started making preparations? Got tips to share?

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Vortex2
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Post by Vortex2 »

We know a retired couple who recently sold their eco house in the Midlands to build another one in Scotland.

Their reason?

He had run some climate models and noticed that any climate disaster would exhibit a fast acting 'tipping point'.

The UK climate could change, according to him, within days or weeks .. and wouldn't change back.

That would leave the Midlands as a very warm area but Scotland would be OK - hence the move.
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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

I doubt that it will be THAT quick, but no harm in planning just in case.

If climate change IS that quick, then millions will die in the UK, and billions in the wider world.
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Post by cubes »

Not being a long-term local might count against you though? Especially in a small community under pressure.
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Post by woodburner »

Vortex2 wrote:We know a retired couple who recently sold their eco house in the Midlands to build another one in Scotland.

Their reason?

He had run some climate models and noticed that any climate disaster would exhibit a fast acting 'tipping point'.

The UK climate could change, according to him, within days or weeks .. and wouldn't change back.

That would leave the Midlands as a very warm area but Scotland would be OK - hence the move.
Surely that would mean loads of people would move to the Midlands just to reduce the heating bills. At least it would stop being seen as damp and depressing so much.
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eatyourveg
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Post by eatyourveg »

cubes wrote:Not being a long-term local might count against you though? Especially in a small community under pressure.
True. Bring skills that aren't readily available in the area.
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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

And enjoy the haggis hunt :)
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Post by Catweazle »

I considered Scotland too, but settled on Pembrokeshire. Property is cheap and plentiful, although not as cheap as parts of Scotland. Land is fertile in places, and poor plots can be improved easily if you are only growing for a family. My house had mains water installed in 1976, when the well dried up for the first time in memory, but I suspect that a deeper well would have been fine, as would a well dug further down the hill where there is a spring.
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Potemkin Villager
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Post by Potemkin Villager »

One big plus of such areas is the still pristine air quality.

One downside is the famously dreich winter days when the cloud base comes down to meet the ground. Those engaged in outdoor seasonal activities particularly notice the more extreme range of hours of darkness and daylight through the year of more northerly spots.

The combination of these two factors usually leads to a degree of semi hibernation in the winter months for those without regular working hours.
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Post by Catweazle »

Wind power, polytunnels and LED grow-lights should be considered.
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Post by clv101 »

Catweazle wrote:Wind power, polytunnels and LED grow-lights should be considered.
Do you use grow lights? I'd be interested in learning how to make the best use of them, which crops, when, the relationship been light and temperature requirements etc.
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Catweazle
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Post by Catweazle »

clv101 wrote:
Catweazle wrote:Wind power, polytunnels and LED grow-lights should be considered.
Do you use grow lights? I'd be interested in learning how to make the best use of them, which crops, when, the relationship been light and temperature requirements etc.
I used growlights for the first time this year. Full spectrum, 2 x 250X .COB devices by Phillips.

I used them to get an early start for my seeds, grown in an outbuilding with clear plastic roof.

It worked well, the seeds grew with thick, sturdy stems instead of the thin lanky stems from previous years efforts.

When the weather warmed up I put them into the polytunnel. The tunnel now has electricity, so next spring the lights will go there too.
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adam2
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Post by adam2 »

UndercoverElephant wrote:
adam2 wrote:Cant offer any specific knowledge of the area, but subject to any serious drawbacks of which I am unaware, this sounds a good idea.

Growing concerns regarding the environmental costs of flying suggests a greater demand for holidays within the UK, so a bed and breakfast will hopefully prove profitable.

Moving from a high population density to a low population density sounds a wise move in case TSHTF.
Running a b+b is an excellent way of making "stealth preps" such as large stocks of food, bedding, fuel, and household equipment in general.

5 acres sounds like a large gardening operation or even a smallholding.

How about naming the operation "WHITECROSS"
Whitecross?
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Post by Tarrel »

Hi UE, just came across your thread. (I don’t log in to PS too often these days). If you need any specific advice on your prospective Highland move, drop me a line. Cheers, Tarrel.
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Post by UndercoverElephant »

Tarrel wrote:Hi UE, just came across your thread. (I don’t log in to PS too often these days). If you need any specific advice on your prospective Highland move, drop me a line. Cheers, Tarrel.
Hi Tarrel, hope you are well!

We have ruled this out now. I had a long discussion with the person from the Scottish equivalent of the Forestry Commission, about the practicalities and regulations I might run into running a foraging business up there. He was quite helpful, but only the sense that it became clear that I would run into some fairly serious problems. That combined with the arcane Scottish house-buying process makes it a non-starter for us. Buying property in England seems to me to be a much fairer and open system, whereas the Scottish system is favourable to the vendor.
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Post by Tarrel »

UndercoverElephant wrote:
Tarrel wrote:Hi UE, just came across your thread. (I don’t log in to PS too often these days). If you need any specific advice on your prospective Highland move, drop me a line. Cheers, Tarrel.
Hi Tarrel, hope you are well!

We have ruled this out now. I had a long discussion with the person from the Scottish equivalent of the Forestry Commission, about the practicalities and regulations I might run into running a foraging business up there. He was quite helpful, but only the sense that it became clear that I would run into some fairly serious problems. That combined with the arcane Scottish house-buying process makes it a non-starter for us. Buying property in England seems to me to be a much fairer and open system, whereas the Scottish system is favourable to the vendor.
Ah, sorry to hear that. It's certainly a nice place to ride out a global pandemic! Surprised about the Foraging business difficulties. Property buying is pretty straightforward. We were advised that a good working rule of thumb is to go in around 5% above the "offers over" price when the market is reasonably buoyant. Worked for us in 2008. God, is it that long it is?!
Engage in geo-engineering. Plant a tree today.
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