Post-brexit transformation of English countryside

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UndercoverElephant
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Post-brexit transformation of English countryside

Post by UndercoverElephant »

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-55102891
England's countryside will radically change after the Brexit transition period, the government has confirmed.

There will be more trees, meadows and wetlands - and fewer sheep and cows as controversial EU farm subsidies are phased out.
Looks like a result to me.
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adam2
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Re: Post-brexit transformation of English countryside

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I agree, I see no problem in people eating meat in moderation if they so wish, but do not feel that large scale or intensive meat production should be subsidised.
It takes a lot more land to feed a person on meat than it does on arable crops. Therefore large scale livestock farming should be largely confined to land that is of limited use for arable.

Sheep do well on poor and hilly land that is unsuited to crops.
Cattle can graze on land that floods regularly.
Pigs can be kept free range in wooded areas.

The keeping of livestock is part of the traditional way of farming, and the dung improves the land. The keeping of huge numbers of animals in unatural conditions is NOT traditional, and should not be subsidised.

The planting of trees should be encouraged, as a carbon sink, to preserve wildlife, and as a future source of building timber and fire wood.
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adam2
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Re: Post-brexit transformation of English countryside

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Pro or anti Brexit posts will be deleted without mercy or notice ! We have an existing thread where such remarks belong.
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Re: Post-brexit transformation of English countryside

Post by kenneal - lagger »

adam2 wrote: Mon Nov 30, 2020 1:34 pm ...................................... Therefore large scale livestock farming should be largely confined to land that is of limited use for arable.
It already is Adam. Only about 40% of UK farmland land is suited to arable and that is the amount of land that is used for that purpose. The rest is mainly used for cattle now as the large areas that were formerly used to raise grass for hay for working horses is no longer needed; while we have mechanical tractors of some sort anyway.
Sheep do well on poor and hilly land that is unsuited to crops.
Cattle can graze on land that floods regularly.
Pigs can be kept free range in wooded areas.

The keeping of livestock is part of the traditional way of farming, and the dung improves the land. The keeping of huge numbers of animals in unatural conditions is NOT traditional, and should not be subsidised.

The planting of trees should be encouraged, as a carbon sink, to preserve wildlife, and as a future source of building timber and fire wood.
The rest I largely agree with as we should reduce the amount of meat that we eat.

The biggest problem with food production is the desire of government worldwide to keep food cheap and readily available to keep the populace happy and content with the way that they are ruled. Also cheap food means that there is more money to spend on the useless and often tatty "stuff" that is produced in the name of economic growth. In the days when food was 30% of household expenditure we didn't, couldn't afford to, buy much "stuff". Because food is so cheap it has no value so we over consume and waste a lot of it.

This aberration in the food market is what causes most of the problems.
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UndercoverElephant
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Re: Post-brexit transformation of English countryside

Post by UndercoverElephant »

I don't think this has much to do with a change in diet. It's just a change in the way farms are subsidised - what farmers are subsidised to do, or not do.
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