Boeing problems, the FAA...

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raspberry-blower
Posts: 1868
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 11:26 am

Post by raspberry-blower »

Wolf Street: More Airlines collapse: Jet, Alitalia, WOW

Posted here as there is a major knock on effect for Boeing:
Jet Airways presently has 217 aircraft of various models on order from Boeing. How many are going to be paid for and will be delivered remains an interesting question and raises even more questions about the feasibility of the maxi-orders placed by many other Asian airlines with vulnerable financials .
Cross posted with this thread:

http://www.powerswitch.org.uk/forum/vie ... 1&start=30
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
raspberry-blower
Posts: 1868
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 11:26 am

Post by raspberry-blower »

Boeing Q1 results now out:

Zero Hedge: Profits tumble and buybacks halted
And while the historical data were dismal at best, missing across the board, what was even more troubling is that while analysts were hoping for some much needed guidance, they won't get it as Boeing suspended its annual forecast, stating that new guidance would be issued at "a future date", which as Bloomberg said was "an expected but nonetheless startling decision that underscores the magnitude of its current crisis."
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
raspberry-blower
Posts: 1868
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 11:26 am

Post by raspberry-blower »

A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
raspberry-blower
Posts: 1868
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 11:26 am

Post by raspberry-blower »

More of the on going Boeing saga from Moon of Alabama.

The more that is uncovered, the worse it gets, not only for Boeing, but, in particular, the FAA.

It now comes to light that there is an inherent design flaw, that could potentially be catastrophic, on the 737 NG series as well.

Boeing 737 Max crash reveals a severe problem with older Boeing 737 NGs

Putting it into context:
The crashes of the two 737 MAX revealed a number of problems with the design of the MCAS system. Several additional issues with the plane were since revealed. There may be other problems with its 737 MAX that no one yet knows of. The rather casual FAA certification of the type was clearly not justified.

But the problems described above are 737 NG problems. The 380 or so existing 737 MAX are currently grounded. But some 7,000 737 NG fly about every day. The record provides that it is a relatively safe airplane. But a runaway stabilizer is a well known electrical malfunction that could by chance happen on any of those flights.
and...
Simulator sessions demonstrate (video) that a runaway stabilizer incident on a 737 NG can no longer be overcome by the procedures that current Boeing manuals describe.

It is pure luck that no NG crash has yet been caused by a runaway stabilizer incident. It is quite astonishing that these issues only now become evident. The 737 NG was certified by the FAA in 1997. Why is the FAA only now looking into this?
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
raspberry-blower
Posts: 1868
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 11:26 am

Post by raspberry-blower »

The continuing saga of the 737 Max rumbles on.

The software used is not fit for purpose
Flight control computer run special operation systems with minimal overhead. They are programmed in highly efficient programming languages. The software design and implementation follows a very strict process using specialized tools (see Green Hills' products for examples). All these are much better than what I used during my programming times.

Programs written for flight control purposes are already highly optimized. To further optimize them 'by hand' would break the regulated process that production of such software requires.

Boeing says that it can again fix the software to avoid the problem the FAA just found. It is doubtful that this will be possible. The software load is already right at the border, if not above the physical capabilities of the current flight control computers. The optimization potential of the software is likely minimal.

MCAS was a band aid. Due to the new engine position the 737 MAX version had changed its behavior compared to the older 737 types even though it still used the older types' certification. MCAS was supposed to correct that. The software fix for MCAS is another band aid on top of it. The fix for the software fix that Boeing now promises to solve the problem the FAA pilot found, is the third band aid over the same wound. It is doubtful that it will stop the bleeding.

The flight control computers the 737 MAX and NG use were developed in the early to mid 1990s. There are no off-the-shelf solutions for higher performance.
Moon of Alabama: Boeing's Software Fix for the 737 Max Problem Overwhelms the Plane's Computer
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
raspberry-blower
Posts: 1868
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 11:26 am

Post by raspberry-blower »

What with Covid 19 doing the rounds it may well prove to be the straw that breaks the camel's back.

Wolf Street: Boeing crashes as $43 billion in past share buybacks turn into an existential threat
Today’s plunge came after a flurry of disclosures and leaks in the morning about Boeing, including:
•Sources said that Boeing is planning to draw down entirely and much quicker than expected its new credit facility of $13.825 billion as early as Friday, apparently worried that banks might freeze the credit facility later, and banks did during the Financial Crisis.
•Boeing disclosed that it had negative net orders of -28 aircraft for the first two months of 2020, with cancellations of the 737 MAX exceeding orders for all models;
Even if Boeing does survive this, it will never be the same behemoth as we currently know it.
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
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