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Posted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 12:46 am
by vtsnowedin
Perhaps I am being a bit optimistic but I see future EVs with enough computer capacity to know all your recent trips and likely next trip with it's energy requirements and be set up to always have plenty of juice to meet your trip demand. You might surprise it getting in and saying take me to Scotland and be disappointed but you could have avoided that when you last parked and plugged in the EV by telling it "Tomorrow we drive to Edinburgh.
Of course real jerks (to use an acceptable descriptive word)" will tell their cyber truck that the next days journey is to the ends of Alice's range.
Having a fleet of Ev's plugged into a plus and minus grid balancing system would be so advantageous to the grid operators that they could not afford to not make it well worth your while to plug in your EV to the system.
That compensation would certainly include any degradation in battery life from it's extra charge discharge cycles.

Posted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 6:19 am
by PS_RalphW
Both Tesla and Mercedes claim to be close to producing "million mile batteries" which would out live most vehicles they are fitted in. Battery degradation would then become of very little concern

Posted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:24 am
by vtsnowedin
PS_RalphW wrote:Both Tesla and Mercedes claim to be close to producing "million mile batteries" which would out live most vehicles they are fitted in. Battery degradation would then become of very little concern
If they achieve that they may well have cars that last until the crash and don't otherwise depreciate. I can certainly see that for southern drivers that never drive in slush and salt. I'll be interested to see how the cyber truck deals with mud and road salt in Vermont. I plan to let my granddaughter drive mine off to college in 2037 :)