A Good Year in the Garden

Working with, rather than against nature.

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Catweazle
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Re: A Good Year in the Garden

Post by Catweazle »

I don't use any poisons or sprays, so I suffer butterflies, greenfly, slugs and snails. My gardening efforts were pitiful this year, it started badly when I had to confine the chickens and ducks to the polytunnel because of avian flu warnings, and never recovered. Early shoots in the tunnel is usually my motivation to get the beds ready for planting.

Must try harder.
kenneal - lagger
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Re: A Good Year in the Garden

Post by kenneal - lagger »

That sums up our summer Cat. We've got a reasonable crop of very large tomatoes but overall the yield is down because of the extreme heat early on which made our tomato plants grow very well but with few flowering trusses. Cucumbers have been very good if a little late. The aubergines and peppers went into the other polytunnel late because the chickens were in there and we have a few small peppers but the aubergine plants are only just starting to flower. Not much hope there.

Potatoes have been good as have runner beans and our leaks are enormous. Eating apples have been excellent but the Bramleys have been very poor due to cold weather when they were in flower. We've had a few plums and no pears for the same reason. Kale is coming on nicely. We planted a new to us squash this year, Trombone, and the plants have gone barmy with about two dozen large fruit on the plants and dozens of smaller ones. I've been cutting off the very small fruit and we've been grating it into minced beef and cooking it up together. Tasted very good indeed and saves wasting the smaller fruit. The large fruit seems to keep well: we've had one which was showing signs of end rot so I cut it off the plants and cut the end off. We've eaten part of it and the rest has been sitting around for a couple of weeks and is still in good condition. We've got four large fruit on one pumpkin plant as well.
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
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careful_eugene
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Location: Nottingham UK

Re: A Good Year in the Garden

Post by careful_eugene »

Middling year at the allotment for me too, Asparagus, onions / shallots, Parsnips, courgettes all good, potatoes were a disaster (presumably due to not enough water), not many peas in comparison to plants. Not a great year for squash but I think the problem is that I'm not hand-pollinating just relying on the insects to do the work. I'm in the process of changing over to a no dig system as others on our site are doing this successfully.
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kenneal - lagger
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Re: A Good Year in the Garden

Post by kenneal - lagger »

A no dig system requires a lot of compost which we have at the moment from a large heap of mixed gorse clippings, old hay and cattle dung on the common where we graze our cattle. There's about 50 tonnes of the stuff and no one else seems to want it. Shame!!

I really must source a grass catcher for my ride on mower so that we can easily pick the grass up for composting. Doing that would encourage wild flowers in the grass and also add a lot to the compost heap. All the grass clippings would probably speed up decomposition as well. We've got a WWOOFer in at the weekend so I'll have to get her to turn some of my compost for me!
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
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