Electrolytic production of hydrogen

Is the proposed 'Hydrogen Economy' going to save the human race or is it all an energy sink that provides no viable answer?

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kenneal - lagger
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Re: Electrolytic production of hydrogen

Post by kenneal - lagger »

I would have thought that the future of the car industry lies in small, batch production runs of light weight, non steel, battery powered cars with a top speed of about 50mph. And those cars would probably be mostly rental or car club cars. That would lead us to long distance buses, battery or fuel cell powered, or even trolley buses along motorways and main roads with trucks powered from the same overhead power lines for long distance and then battery or fuel cell powered of the main roads.

I can't see steel cars, even "green steel" cars, having a long term future. It requires a paradigm shift and the sooner that shift comes the better it will be for the environment.
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Mark
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Re: Electrolytic production of hydrogen

Post by Mark »

'World first': Sheet glass produced with hydrogen at UK plant for first time:
https://www.investliverpool.com/news/wo ... ufacturer/

Another small step, but interestingly the article doesn't mention where the hydrogen came from.....
Was it 'Brown', 'Grey', 'Blue' or 'Green' ?
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adam2
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Re: Electrolytic production of hydrogen

Post by adam2 »

Brown hydrogen seems a fair assumption, in the absence of any claims otherwise.
Still an interesting development for the future.
If enough green hydrogen is to be produced for industry, we will need a lot more wind turbines.

We will need enough renewably generated electricity to meet all, or almost all, of our present electricity demand, AND still have enough left over to produce hydrogen.
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Re: Electrolytic production of hydrogen

Post by Mark »

World's biggest green hydrogen project announced for Kazakhstan:
https://newatlas.com/energy/worlds-bigg ... azakhstan/
Germany's Svevind has announced plans for a colossal green hydrogen project that will place some 45 gigawatts of wind and solar energy generation on the vast steppes of Kazakhstan to produce around three million tonnes of green hydrogen annually.

This project will utterly dwarf the biggest project currently in planning or underway; it boasts more than twice the production capacity of the Asian Renewable Energy Hub that's just been deemed "clearly unacceptable" by Australia's conservative environment minister, and it's projected to produce five times more than the Enegix Base One project in Brazil. The biggest green hydrogen plant in the world today, Air Liquide's facility in Canada, marshals just 20 MW of peak electrolyzing capability – this Svevind project plans to run a monstrous 30 GW of electrolyzers.
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adam2
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Re: Electrolytic production of hydrogen

Post by adam2 »

Certainly impressive. It would make more sense to use the renewably generated electricity for general domestic and industrial purposes, instead of burning fossil fuel to produce that electricity.

If however the scale of this proposed plant is so great that existing domestic and industrial electricity demand can be fully met AND produce hydrogen, then the proposal has considerable merit.

Hydrogen cant be readily transported by tanker, but export by pipeline is a possibility, and as suggested, local use for energy intensive industry is attractive. Production of steel, glass, bricks and cement for example.

AFAIK hydrogen is not applicable to aluminium production, that is an electrolytic process that absolutely needs electricity.

I see a bright future for hydrogen produced by renewably generated electricity but ONLY AFTER other electricity demand is fully satisfied by renewably generated electricity.

It is POINTLESS to use electricity to generate hydrogen, whilst still burning natural gas to make electricity anywhere in the same country, or area.
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