Gas supply crunch

How will oil depletion affect the way we live? What will the economic impact be? How will agriculture change? Will we thrive or merely survive?

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kenneal - lagger
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by kenneal - lagger »

A Polish school friend of mine used blankets but they wrapped them in a cover so that they were very much like a duvet.

Happy Christmas all.
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emordnilap
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by emordnilap »

adam2 wrote: Thu Dec 23, 2021 10:50 pm Agree, that many people dress most unsuitably, and then complain at the cost of heating.
Most adults and children do not need a room temperature greater than 22 degrees, and could perhaps manage with slightly lower temperatures.

Current temperatures in my home.
Living room-------------------------------about 23 degrees, but rather variable according to where measured.
Bathroom----------------------------------14 degrees, can be heated to mid 20s with Tilley radiator when showering etc. Not heated otherwise.
Kitchen-------------------------------------21 degrees due to recent use of oven, usually colder than that.
Bedroom------------------------------------15 degrees, electric heater available but not normally used.
Downstairs W.C.---------------------------12 Degrees, can be heated with an oil lamp to prevent frost damage, but not needed at present.

I am wearing one piece long underwear, lightweight trousers, sweatshirt, Cornish smock.
Pretty much the same here (though I have a fleece on rather than a smock).

The wife is keeping warm knocking out an old fireplace. :D :D :D

Doing a bit of work in the garden is always a good way of saving fuel.

We don't light the woodstove till it's dark.
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Vortex2
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by Vortex2 »

Current temperatures in my home.
Living room-------------------------------about 23 degrees, but rather variable according to where measured.
Bathroom----------------------------------14 degrees, can be heated to mid 20s with Tilley radiator when showering etc. Not heated otherwise.
Kitchen-------------------------------------21 degrees due to recent use of oven, usually colder than that.
Bedroom------------------------------------15 degrees, electric heater available but not normally used.
Downstairs W.C.---------------------------12 Degrees, can be heated with an oil lamp to prevent frost damage, but not needed at present.


We have a warm air system so we live at 19C - 20C mostly, in every room.
Can drop to 16C for a while early mornings as the heat pump is heating water overnight.
Last edited by Vortex2 on Wed Dec 29, 2021 10:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Vortex2
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by Vortex2 »

Not sure if it's been mentioned yet ...

The UK and Europe have 'hijacked' several LNG tankers to come to us.

The price we are paying must be crazy!

(This situation reveals how fragile the Western Europe enegy system is. We could be brought to our knees in days following a major incident, natural or manmade. Being off-grid - or with buffer stores - makes a lot more sense now).
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adam2
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by adam2 »

I don't believe that we have "hijacked" any LNG tankers. Hijacking implies armed force taking over a vessel.
More likely is that we have simply offered a higher price than was otherwise available.

Gas prices have dropped a bit, but remain at THREE times the last peak, and at many times the historical norm.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
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emordnilap
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by emordnilap »

adam2 wrote: Wed Dec 29, 2021 10:28 am I don't believe that we have "hijacked" any LNG tankers. Hijacking implies armed force taking over a vessel.
More likely is that we have simply offered a higher price than was otherwise available.

Gas prices have dropped a bit, but remain at THREE times the last peak, and at many times the historical norm.
Gasumped? :D :D
I experience pleasure and pains, and pursue goals in service of them, so I cannot reasonably deny the right of other sentient agents to do the same - Steven Pinker
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BritDownUnder
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by BritDownUnder »

I have noticed on Gridwatch that nuclear power is quite high. Must be running most reactors now.

Energy storage is a problem for Europe as like most other things electricity has become a 'just-in-time' business.
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adam2
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by adam2 »

This report states that high gas prices "could last for two years" whilst implying that after those two years, that everything will be back to normal.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-59957716

Also the effort to re-brand natural gas as being a good and green " transitional fuel" rather than a bad old fashioned fossil fuel.
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
kenneal - lagger
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Re: Gas supply crunch

Post by kenneal - lagger »

Vortex2 wrote: Wed Dec 29, 2021 10:00 am ..............
(This situation reveals how fragile the Western Europe enegy system is. We could be brought to our knees in days following a major incident, natural or manmade. Being off-grid - or with buffer stores - makes a lot more sense now).
It's not just the energy system. When Suez was blocked for a few weeks last autumn almost the whole retail distribution system of Europe went into melt down and it is still recovering.

The food distribution system isn't much better either and ours, in the UK, is probably the worse as the rely on imports so much!
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
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