The Ben Bernanke Balance Sheet

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UndercoverElephant
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The Ben Bernanke Balance Sheet

Post by UndercoverElephant »

http://www.theautomaticearth.com/ben-be ... nce-sheet/

Ben is retiring in February.
Ben Bernanke wrote:
• (July, 2005) “We’ve never had a decline in house prices on a nationwide basis. So, what I think what is more likely is that house prices will slow, maybe stabilize, might slow consumption spending a bit. I don’t think it’s gonna drive the economy too far from its full employment path, though.”

• (October 20, 2005) “House prices have risen by nearly 25% over the past two years. Although speculative activity has increased in some areas, at a national level these price increases largely reflect strong economic fundamentals.”

• (November 15, 2005) “With respect to their safety, derivatives, for the most part, are traded among very sophisticated financial institutions and individuals who have considerable incentive to understand them and to use them properly.”

• (February 15, 2006) “Housing markets are cooling a bit. Our expectation is that the decline in activity or the slowing in activity will be moderate, that house prices will probably continue to rise.”

• (October 4, 2006) “If current trends continue, the typical U.S. worker will be considerably more productive several decades from now. Thus, one might argue that letting future generations bear the burden of population aging is appropriate, as they will likely be richer than we are even taking that burden into account.”

• (February 15, 2007) “Despite the ongoing adjustments in the housing sector, overall economic prospects for households remain good. Household finances appear generally solid, and delinquency rates on most types of consumer loans and residential mortgages remain low.”

• (March 28, 2007) “At this juncture, however, the impact on the broader economy and financial markets of the problems in the subprime market seems likely to be contained. In particular, mortgages to prime borrowers and fixed-rate mortgages to all classes of borrowers continue to perform well, with low rates of delinquency.”

• (May 17, 2007) “All that said, given the fundamental factors in place that should support the demand for housing, we believe the effect of the troubles in the subprime sector on the broader housing market will likely be limited, and we do not expect significant spillovers from the subprime market to the rest of the economy or to the financial system. The vast majority of mortgages, including even subprime mortgages, continue to perform well. Past gains in house prices have left most homeowners with significant amounts of home equity, and growth in jobs and incomes should help keep the financial obligations of most households manageable.”

• (October 31, 2007) “It is not the responsibility of the Federal Reserve – nor would it be appropriate – to protect lenders and investors from the consequences of their financial decisions.”

• (January 10, 2008) “The Federal Reserve is not currently forecasting a recession.”

• (January 18, 2008) “[The U.S. economy] has a strong labor force, excellent productivity and technology, and a deep and liquid financial market that is in the process of repairing itself.”

• (June 10, 2008) “The risk that the economy has entered a substantial downturn appears to have diminished over the past month or so.”

• (July 2008, before House Financial Services Committee) “Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are adequately capitalized.”

• (December 2010) “I wish I’d been omniscient and seen the crisis coming.”
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Ralph
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Post by Ralph »

So he didn't see it coming. Which is worse, not seeing it coming or hallucinating things that don't (Colin Campbell and peak oil in 1989 say?).

But once Ben squared up, he saved the planet. Let's hear it for his training, experience, and foresight in stopping TEOTWAEKI as effectively as tight oil grows oil production.

Three huzzahs for Ben!

Ben Bernanke spent his whole life training for the job of Fed chairman - even if he didn't know it at the time.

One of the Great Depression's most prominent scholars, Bernanke inherited a historic slump of his own not long after taking the helm of the Federal Reserve eight years ago.

He took the central bank on an aggressive and unorthodox course that came to define his legacy as Fed chairman, making his shoes very tough to fill according to economists and current and former policymakers.

They describe his responses to the sagging economy as nothing short of heroic, possibly helping the U.S. avert a repeat of the Great Depression.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/101100730
woodburner
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Post by woodburner »

Seems these banker types can spew all the crap that suits, it's not them tht has to pay when they screw up.
To become an extremist, hang around with people you agree with. Cass Sunstein
Tarrel
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Post by Tarrel »

But once Ben squared up, he saved the planet
:lol: :lol: :lol:
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woodburner
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Post by woodburner »

Rubbish, Gordon Brown had already done it. I know, he said so.
To become an extremist, hang around with people you agree with. Cass Sunstein
3rdRock

Post by 3rdRock »

woodburner wrote:Seems these banker types can spew all the crap that suits, it's not them tht has to pay when they screw up.
You'd enjoy a new book by Susan George which was reviewed a couple of days ago.

http://www.theguardian.com/global-devel ... -austerity
"Ordinary people in the [global] south from the late 1970s until today have had to pay for the crimes and the greed and the odious debts of the dictators of their own governments, of their own upper classes, and they know very well what this means for the population: it means deep cuts in housing, education, culture, health," she says.

"Now it's our turn. Now it's called austerity. Call it what you like, but it's the same policy – it's socialise losses, privatise profits … [and] this has been pushed to a point where, although we began richer than the countries of the south … we are really creating now a situation where there are desperately poor people in Europe, in Britain, in normally wealthy countries."

The question for George is whether the austerity programmes pushed by European governments despite their social costs are mistakes, or deliberate policies. She is convinced of the latter and argues there is a class in Europe that has never accepted the gains working people have made since the second world war and has decided that this is the perfect moment to try to claw them back.
The book? How To Win The Class War - The Lugano Report II
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RenewableCandy
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Post by RenewableCandy »

Has anyone else heard that (apparently) Milton Friedman, on knowing he hadn't long left to live, recanted his entire economic theory?
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raspberry-blower
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Post by raspberry-blower »

RenewableCandy wrote:Has anyone else heard that (apparently) Milton Friedman, on knowing he hadn't long left to live, recanted his entire economic theory?
Nope - bit ****ing late though, considering all the damage his "economic theory" has caused! :twisted:
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
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RenewableCandy
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Post by RenewableCandy »

Yes, isn't it always like that though?... However, according to Wikipedia he was very-much against "the Draft" and seems to have helped in its USA abolition, and became (in 2006 or perhaps before) in favour of the Citizen's Income (called it "negative income tax") on the grounds that it enabled people whose work, for whatever reason, is under-valued, to carry on earning a living.

Who knows, if his policies had been enacted complete with the C.I. they might have worked.
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raspberry-blower
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Post by raspberry-blower »

Yep, t'was always thus!

BTW on a similar theme here's the Keiser Report featuring the basic income movement

Wasn't there another thread on this?
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
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Post by extractorfan »

I agree with his 31st October 2007 statement though.
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